WIMBLEDON VILLAGE MONTAGE | RECTANGULAR VERSION | IMAGE SIZE: A1

£350

Description

A colourful montage of fifty-four photographs of Wimbledon Village photographed by Photographer Patrick Steel. Pre-mounted ready for framing. All of the 54 individual images are printed to 3.5 inches square

The price includes: Dry mounting onto acid free board, window mounting, titled and signed in pencil and wrapped in a protective sleeve of polypropylene acetate film, ready for framing
Image size: A1, a montage of 54 images each printed to 3.5 inches square
Overall size including white window mount: 37.5 x 27 inches
Print type: Fine Art Giclée / Kodak Pro Lustre 270gsm Endura Paper
Edition: Open
Copyright: ©Patrick Steel

Information: Wimbledon is a district of southwest London, England, 7.1 miles (11.4 km) south-west of the centre of London at Charing Cross, in the London Borough of Merton, south of Wandsworth, northeast of New Malden, northwest of Mitcham, west of Streatham and north of Sutton. Wimbledon had a population of 68,187 in 2011 which includes the electoral wards of Abbey, Dundonald, Hillside, Trinity, Village, Raynes Park and Wimbledon Park

It is home to the Wimbledon Tennis Championships and New Wimbledon Theatre, and contains Wimbledon Common, one of the largest areas of common land in London. The residential and retail area is split into two sections known as the “village” and the “town”, with the High Street being the rebuilding of the original medieval village, and the “town” having first developed gradually after the building of the railway station in 1838

Wimbledon has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age when the hill fort on Wimbledon Common is thought to have been constructed. In 1087 when the Domesday Book was compiled, Wimbledon was part of the manor of Mortlake. The ownership of the manor of Wimbledon changed between various wealthy families many times during its history, and the area also attracted other wealthy families who built large houses such as Eagle House, Wimbledon Manor House and Warren House. The village developed with a stable rural population coexisting alongside nobility and wealthy merchants from the city. In the 18th century the Dog and Fox public house became a stop on the stagecoach run from London to Portsmouth, then in 1838 the London and South Western Railway opened a station to the south east of the village at the bottom of Wimbledon hill. The location of the station shifted the focus of the town’s subsequent growth away from the original village centre

Wimbledon had its own borough larger than its historic boundaries while still in the county of Surrey; it was absorbed into the London Borough of Merton as part of the creation of Greater London in 1965. Since 2005, the north and west of the Borough has been represented in Westminster by Stephen Hammond, a Conservative MP. The eastern and southern of the Borough are represented by Siobhain McDonagh, a Labour MP

It has established minority groups; among the most prominent are British Asians (including British Sri Lankans), British GhanaiansPolish and Irish people

Wimbledon, a small farming locality in New Zealand, was named after this district in the 1880s after a local resident shot a bullock from a considerable distance away. The shot was considered by onlookers to be worthy of the rifle-shooting championships held in Wimbledon at the time

Wimbledon Common is a large open space in Wimbledon, south-west London, totalling 460 hectares (1,140 acres). There are three named areas: Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath, and Putney Lower Common, which together are managed under the name Wimbledon and Putney Commons. Putney Lower Common is separated from the rest of the Common by about 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometres) of built-up area of southwest Putney

Wimbledon Common consists mainly of a plateau of acidic grassland, the most notable area being The Plain. Scarcely a crest breaks the smooth table and nowhere can you find a summit. Soils are impoverished gravels, ideal for heathland and bogs. The land falls away to the west down through the other main habitat, mature woodlands, to Beverley Brook, where the geology is predominantly London clay

The golf course used by the two golf clubs is also a large feature of Wimbledon Common